Monthly Archives: June 2013

What’s the Importance of a Good Business Card?

Your business card leaves a lasting impression. It’s usually the one physical thing a person takes away from a meeting or encounter, and it can be your golden ticket to future contact… or end up in the trash, along with your chances of ever hearing from that person again.

Many of the business cards we see today are typical, boring, and unrelated to a business’ services. Websites like Vistaprint and Zazzle offer free templates – but how many other businesses are using that very same design? And does it really make sense to have a card with a flower motif if your business is more focused on tree removal?

John Jantsch, a marketing consultant and the man behind Duct Tape Marketing, says the need for a business card “is pretty limited in business these days. For the most part people can either find the info online or zap it to each other electronically. In a way this shift has made the business card an opportunity to make a statement. … Since people aren’t using them that much you have the ability to stand out by doing so.”

Your business card design should be unique – something that people associate with you and want to hold onto. But don’t let that sidetrack you from making the look and feel of it represent you and your services.

What are the elements of a great business card?

  • Remarkable. Make it unique so it – and, in turn, you – gets noticed.
  • Clear messaging. Does the card really tell what it is you do? Does it communicate your brand?
  • Clean design. Too simple or amateur looking and it looks bad on you; too complex and it might lose detail.
  • The right size. Not too big (it should still fit in a business card pocket), not too small… think Goldilocks and get it just right.
  • High print quality. Don’t skimp. You pay for what you get. A stellar design looks so-so when it is printed poorly – or printed on the wrong medium.
  • Clear contact information. Don’t hide the most important information – and the reason for handing out the business card in the first place.

If you’re not sure how to design something that will be remembered – and held onto – then hire a designer. It will be well worth the investment.

Note: We do business cards differently at Infinitely Big. Check these out…

LemonAidFactoryBCLAWVending

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Make Your Definitions More Interesting…

One of the more fundamental yet boring slides in a PowerPoint is the definitions slide. This may actually, in a really painful case, represent multiple slides. Here are some pointers for making the definition process fun and engaging for the audience.

Typically, you will see a slide that says “Definitions” in bold and underlined across the top. Then, listed underneath in microscopic font will be key terms and their respective meanings. Instead of using this method — which, by the way, is certain to bore your audience into a coma before you really even get started — try the following:

Let’s use the term “mammal” as an example. Across the top of the slide, state “What are mammals?” Open it up to the audience and find out what they believe the definition of a mammal is. This engages the audience, will certainly get some laughs, allows you to clear up any misconceptions, and gives you an idea of what you are dealing with in terms of your audience.

While getting audience input, add your own commentary. Correct what they are saying and add detail. Praise those who are accurate and reiterate what they have said to drill it home.

Next, on that same slide, use graphics to show examples of mammals. Introduce them one by one, focusing on the characteristics that make them mammals. Show pictures of humans, monkeys, lions, tigers, and bears (oh my!). This makes the concept real and relatable for the audience. And, again, keep things interesting and interactive.

Finally, end with the definition you want the audience to remember. It may be a simplified version of a standard definition, but it should be accurate and usable by the audience. This strategy will allow you to put your best foot forward with intriguing definitions that are memorable and meaningful to the audience.

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Considering a Tablet?

I came across this commercial the other day, and I thought you all might enjoy it.

We recently switched to using the Microsoft Surface Pro in our office, and we are really impressed. It’s a great hybrid of a computer and a tablet. Tablets running iOS or Android seem more like toys if you try to get them to handle anything more than watching movies, surfing the Web, checking email, or playing games. The Surface Pro is powerful and easily able to handle robust applications, making it a good choice for business productivity.

Here are three of the coolest features:

  1. Size. It’s compact and portable. We really don’t miss carrying around a heavy, cumbersome laptop.
  2. USB port. Most other tablets don’t have a USB port – with the iPad, a special adapter is needed to connect most peripherals. The Surface Pro’s onboard USB port means we can plug in a flash drive, a wireless mouse, or even a USB hub with multiple connections.
  3. Runs all applications. Since it runs Windows 8, we can use the full version of the Office suite in addition to apps built for tablets.

PowerPoint is still the tool of choice for designing presentations, and tablets running Windows 8 are the only ones that can handle creating, editing, and displaying presentations with the same power as a regular computer. That means we can continue to develop amazing presentations while taking advantage of the portability of a tablet and the richness of a PC.

Have you considered switching to a tablet?

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