Monthly Archives: September 2013

Excel and PowerPoint Don’t Mix…

SpreadsheetVery often presentations will include financials or other figures. And, of course, the presenter believes that the best way to present this data is by cramming as much as he can into a gigantic Excel spreadsheet and then copying and pasting that 6,250-cell spreadsheet onto one small PowerPoint slide. Impressive, right? Think again, presenter… this has zero impact. And, it will even distract from your presentation because people will lose focus as they won’t be able to see what you are referring to and follow along.

Spreadsheets are used for analyzing, not for communicating. They are fantastic for quickly figuring out totals or averages or for doing hundreds or even thousands of calculations instantly on rows and rows of data. They are not, however, great for presenting. Simply put, they contain way too much information. My advice is to simplify: do you really need to present all of the data? Or just the results?

By focusing on the results in some sort of summary fashion like a table, the audience can see the numbers big and clear. You can explain how you arrived at each number if you see fit. You can walk them through it step by step but you don’t need to show the entire process. Use colors, percentages, underlining, boldface, and other effects to highlight key figures or show comparisons or differences within the results. With a summary table you have a powerful, focused image that you can now play around with and be creative.

In the end, the audience will remain more focused and in tune with your presentation and you will be able to get your point across more succinctly and effectively.

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Top 10 Mobile Facts

166153695I came across an insert in my recent issue of Advertising Age that was all about mobile marketing facts and figures. The information contained is eye-opening for anyone trying to reach consumers, especially as “online audiences started shifting away from PCs faster than anyone expected,” according to Michael Learmonth, AdAge’s digital editor.

Here are the top 10 facts:

  1. Google’s Android platform runs on 52.4% of U.S. smartphones, while Apple’s iOS runs on 39.2% (meaning these two service nearly 92% of subscribers)
  2. Facebook is the #2 app on iOS and #4 app on Android
  3. The number of U.S. tablet users is expected to grow from 93.9 million in 2012 to 178 million by 2017 – an increase of almost 90%
  4. Worldwide, 58.1% of the population used a mobile phone in 2012, and that number is expected to reach 69% by 2017
  5. Worldwide, 15.7% of the population used a smartphone in 2012, and that number is expected to reach 34% by 2017
  6. Among U.S. smartphone users, 50.9% used a video app in the last 30 days, while 32.1% used one in the last seven days (YouTube is the most-used video app)
  7. U.S. mobile ad spending is projected to reach almost $28 billion by 2017
  8. The top five social networks in the U.S. are Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, tumblr, and LinkedIn
  9. Google’s share of worldwide net mobile ad revenue in 2012 was 52.36%, while Facebook came in at 5.35%
  10. Adults spend an average of 141 minutes a day using mobile devices

Source: Crain Communication Inc., “Mobile Fact Pack: A Guide to Mobile Marketing,” Advertising Age, Aug. 19, 2013.

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