Tag Archives: communication

And the Telly Goes To…

tellyInfinitely Big’s video service has been recognized for one of the industry’s most prestigious awards!

We are pleased to announce that Infinitely Big has been selected as a bronze winner in the 35th Annual Telly Awards competition for a video about a charity program for a Fortune 500 company. With nearly 12,000 entries from all 50 states and numerous countries, this is truly an honor.

The Telly Awards was founded in 1979 and is the premier award honoring outstanding local, regional, and cable TV commercials and programs, the finest video and film productions, and online commercials, video and films. Winners represent the best work of the most respected advertising agencies, production companies, television stations, cable operators, and corporate video departments in the world.

“The Telly Awards has a mission to honor the very best in film and video,” said Linda Day, executive director of the Telly Awards. “Infinitely Big’s accomplishment illustrates their creativity, skill, and dedication to their craft and serves as a testament to great film and video production.”

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Trello: Our Latest Obsession…

Trello Dev BoardHere at Infinitely Big, we make it a point to stay organized. When we work on client projects, we create lists, this way we can check items off as complete – an important task considering many creative hands work together to create an amazing end product.

So how do we keep up with it all? One thing we use is an online collaboration tool called Trello.

With Trello, you can organize just about anything with boards, which are made up of multiple lists. The lists contain cards, which you can use to collaborate with other users via comments and assignments. You can organize items using color coding, and even enable a feature that sets up your board more like a calendar for an added visual punch. The best part? It’s free!

How do you stay organized? Let us know of any interesting tools in the comments.

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The NEW Video…

Source: B2B Content Marketing Report: 2013 Survey Results, LinkedIn B2B Technology Marketing Community

Source: B2B Content Marketing Report: 2013 Survey Results, LinkedIn B2B Technology Marketing Community

Video is taking over. Journalism sites like BuzzFeed and Huffington Post are now using video to tell the stories that articles used to. Following the shift from print to interactive media, company websites can host internal videos to inform and update their teams instead of distributing print newsletters and materials. Marketers are studying how to best generate interest through the unique visual intimacy that only video can provide. And assisting in this upsurge are the social media sites – both for internal corporate use, like Yammer, and external, like Facebook – that allow for easy video sharing. Why say it if you can just play it, right?

A recent study by LinkedIn’s largest online group, The B2B Technology Marketing Community, thinks so. In a recent survey, its 50,000 members confirmed the current demand for content production, naming video as one of the most effective mediums for consumers to receive information, and, more importantly, react.

And where there’s priority to reach your audience, there’s certainly the priority to do it right! As the survey reveals, video production is the most outsourced form of content marketing. Now, with more than 80% of B2B marketers planning to increase their content production over the next 12 months, all signs point to video as the gateway to create consumer interest.

Here at Infinitely Big we not only embrace this platform, we enhance it. Our in-house production service covers everything from internal corporate videos to broadcast commercials. Click here to discover all the ways our video services can exceed your expectations!

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Kick Off 2014 With These 14 Communication Quotes…

175563453Are you ready to do amazing things in 2014? With every New Year comes the potential for so many great things. Start this year off right with some words of wisdom from those who knew about success and the importance of communication. Happy New Year!

The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place. – George Bernard Shaw

The most important thing in communication is hearing what isn’t said. – Peter Drucker

I’m a great believer that any tool that enhances communication has profound effects in terms of how people can learn from each other, and how they can achieve the kind of freedoms that they’re interested in. – Bill Gates

To effectively communicate, we must realize that we are all different in the way we perceive the world and use this understanding as a guide to our communication with others. – Tony Robbins

Communication is a skill that you can learn. It’s like riding a bicycle or typing. If you’re willing to work at it, you can rapidly improve the quality of every part of your life. – Brian Tracy

Effective communication is 20% what you know and 80% how you feel about what you know. – Jim Rohn

The ability to simplify means to eliminate the unnecessary so that the necessary may speak. – Hans Hofmann

Communication leads to community, that is, to understanding, intimacy and mutual valuing. – Rollo May

There is only one rule for being a good talker – learn to listen. – Christopher Morley

The two words “information” and “communication” are often used interchangeably, but they signify quite different things. Information is giving out; communication is getting through. – Sydney J. Harris

Start with good people, lay out the rules, communicate with your employees, motivate them and reward them. If you do all those things effectively, you can’t miss. – Lee Iacocca

If you have a great idea, you should be able to communicate it as well. It’s like the sound of one hand clapping. You have a great idea but aren’t able to express it – well, how great was the idea? – Douglas Coupland

You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you. – Dale Carnegie

The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between lightning and a lightning bug. – Mark Twain

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Is It Time for a Refresh?

You are an expert in your field – you know the intricacies and the nuances of your product or service better than anyone. Thus, you are often asked to speak publicly about your area of specialty. And like anyone with a lot to do and little time, you have a stock PowerPoint that you have created that you use over and again. It saves time and it works pretty well. As you read this and think about that PowerPoint you have created, I would encourage you to go through it and dispose of many of those slides.

Why, you ask? Because with each day, you get better and so should your PowerPoint. Think of new and creative ways to present your key points. Brainstorm ways to make complicated topics simpler to understand. Come up with ideas on ways to better engage your audience. Think of areas that went over really well in prior presentations and maybe put more focus there and for those areas that didn’t go over so well, how about a new strategy or eliminating the level of depth in that section.

Of course, you will also want to add slides that pertain to relevant industry news, updated research, and your own headlines – new business, new people, new products, etc. The point is, as you evolve, so should your PowerPoint presentation. While it may save time reusing your old one, it is worth the energy and effort to rebuild and revamp every couple of months. It pushes you to be better and will ultimately leave a better impression on the audience.

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Take Control of Your Audience’s Memory…

161919220Wouldn’t it be great to control what your audience remembers after your presentation is done? Rather than them going back to the office with a memory of the great coffee or the attractive blonde in the front row or even the bad joke you told, they might actually remember key points you made. Here are a few ideas on how you can help improve retention:

  1. Have a key message. Decide what your presentation is really about. Have one key message (you can have sub-messages but only one key message) and build your presentation around this.
  2. Keep it simple. Just because you only have one key message doesn’t mean you have to pack everything into this one message. Keep it simple and it will be much easier to retain.
  3. Identify the key message. Make it known what your key takeaway is. Say “this is the key takeaway” or “this is the most important point” or “this is the key message.”
  4. Repeat. Do this throughout to remind the audience of what the key message is by coming back to it. If it’s your key message, your presentation should relate to it throughout.
  5. Leave it on the screen. Keep it up on the screen while you are talking so the audience sees it visually. This will help them remember. You may even try associating a picture with your message if one is relevant.

This form of mind-control is perfectly legal in all 50 states. So give it a shot and you will see your audience is much more likely to contact you the next time they need help because they remember that you offered a solution.

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Consistency Wins…

One of the great things about chain restaurants like T.G.I. Friday’s, The Olive Garden, or Burger King – and it’s not their food – is consistency. You can walk into a T.G.I. Friday’s in New York City or Omaha, Neb., and you know what you are going to get. There is no deviation – the look is the same, the food is the same, and the prices are relatively the same. You never have to worry about getting sick or what the bathroom will look like. Again, I am not saying the food is fabulous or the places are immaculate – the point is, you know what you are going to get. And often, that in itself is comforting.

Think about your business for a minute. Do your corporate communications show consistency? Do you use the same logo on your letterhead, in an email newsletter, and in a print ad? Do your salespeople all communicate in the same manner? How about your customer service reps? Do they have a similar personality to one another? Do they provide similar results call after call?

Consistency and confidence in the areas mentioned above will keep your customers around for a long time to come. Just the way you are more comfortable with the golden arches than the local burger joint in a new city, your customers are comfortable with what’s familiar and consistent. They know what to expect and that is priceless.

It sounds easy, but consistency can be very challenging. But, if you can be consistent in the way you operate, you will keep your competitors at bay.

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Free PR for Your Business…

166127053We all need a little public relations in our lives… but PR can cost money, you say. You have to hire a PR person, pay them per project or a monthly retainer, etc. But this is not necessarily always the case. There are many ways in which you can generate free PR for your business. The most obvious is a press release. Write it yourself; there are many sites that offer free press release distribution. This can spread around the web, get picked up by newspapers, magazines, and other media outlets and thereby drum up great business.

Here are some other ways to get free PR:

  • Writing articles: Write about how to do something – this is always valuable for readers. The article doesn’t have to be long, just informative. This also gives you great credibility and can establish you as an expert in a certain area.
  • Newsletters: Create a weekly or monthly email newsletter that you distribute to clients, prospects, and anyone else who wants to hear what you have to say. This is great advertising and keeps you in front of the people you want to be speaking with.
  • Public speaking: Speaking in front of an audience usually makes you an expert. People like to buy from experts. If they’re in your audience, then they’ll remember your expertise and come to you when they need your product or service.
  • Free guides / reports: Offering a free guide or report online is a good way to get an e-mail address from prospects so you may market to them later. The free report can be a dressed-up article, a list, a survey that you’ve done, or some research-based information.
  • Online forum participation: Participate in relevant newsgroups and forums… people will get to see your posts and get to know you. Answer questions, post new questions, etc. LinkedIn is a great place for this if you join industry-related groups.
  • Letters to the editor: Many times a letter to the editor has a better chance of getting published than the actual press release. You’d be surprised how many people read this column in publications. This is also another way to become friends with the editor. If they see you enough and match you with a newsworthy press release, then your chances of getting a press release in print increases.
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Keeping It Real…

The more true to life you can portray an issue you are presenting in your PowerPoint, the better your audience will understand, relate, and identify with it. This is your ideal goal – to get your audience to know that you understand their pain, their issue, and that you have a way to help resolve it or make it better. The impact you can add by using photos, videos, sound, or other media is extremely powerful and should not be overlooked. Here are a couple of ideas on types of media and when to use them.

  • Use illustrations or video to clarify. If your product is complicated, an illustration or video lets you simplify the way it looks. Also, illustrations and videos allow you to show a zoomed-in view or a view normally not seen, such as a product interior.
  • Motion, sound, and music. Just because PowerPoint has this feature doesn’t mean you need to use it. Use sparingly and only when deemed appropriate. Adding animation, sound effects, or music will make your presentation come alive, but it also lessens the seriousness of what you are presenting. Animation can be valuable when offering a product demonstration, but using when not needed will detract rather than add from the overall presentation.
  • Keep charts and graphs simple. Charts and graphs that are used to support a point should be simple and instantly understood. Audiences will be confused by overly complex visuals.
  • Photos have tremendous impact. A picture is worth a thousand words. This holds true in a PowerPoint. Finding a relatable image to put into your presentation can create an significant impression. It will leave your audience with an image resonating in their head when they go back to the office. Make it very relatable to a key point and they will not forget what you had to say.

As you can see, there is plenty of room for creativity in your presentations. Using illustrations and photos or graphs and animations can be very powerful. But beware… overuse these tools and they will detract from your presentation, making it lose gravity and impact.

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You Can’t Read This…

Large AudienceHow many times have you been listening to a presentation and the presenter gets to an extremely dense slide and says, “I know you can’t read this in the back, so I will read it to you…” Aaaggggghhhh (that’s my frustration coming through). I don’t know about you, but I sit there and think to myself, if you know I can’t read it, why didn’t you use a bigger font?

While we may think that jamming as much text as possible on a slide is the way to go, that’s not necessarily the case. Use big fonts, fewer words, and emphasize what is essential on the slides. Then discuss each bullet or topic. Use your words as the presentation, not the written words on the PowerPoint slide. Ten-point font is going to be too small… try 24-point or 32-point and keep your bullets short.

Remember, the goal is audience clarity and retention, not stuffing your slides full of words for you to read.

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